Diet Disease Gout

Diet disease Gout -
what can and cant we eat

There appears to be a direct diet disease gout link. Of course we can talk about a genetic disposition to certain practises but certain foods and drinks can precipitate an acute attack of gout in a hyperuricaemic individual.These tend to be individual peculiarities and there is no predictable pattern in food consumption.

Specific foods which precipitate gout in an individual like prawns for instance should be avoided but there is no way of selecting these in advance without prior knowledge of how your body reacts.

Diet disease gout would have its main effect on gout by its effect on the serum urate concentration.The main dietary factors having an effect on the serum urate concentration are fluid consumption,dietary purines,alcohol consumption and body weight.

An imbalance between urate production and excretion as an effect of "over nutrition" will certainly reveal the link. Alcohol increases increases irate production and reduces irate excretion because of its breakdown to lactate. It may also of course contain purines and as such , regular consumption may contribute to hyperuricaemia.

If the intake of foods which are degraded to uric acid produces more uric acid than can be eliminated by the body, hyperuricanemia can result.

Diet disease gout

Tissues being broken down to produce uric acid are those containing nuclei ,particularly all flesh. It appears to make little difference between fish or meat.In those that consume excessive purines , but whose kidneys are able to eliminate such a vast load , the serum concentration of urate may remain normal. However, some people may have a very high urine serum urate concentration which can cause problems in the forum of renal stones made of uric acid or calcium oxalate. The diet, in general will have a minimum effect on gout provided there are no excesses of alcohol or food which can cause rapid fluctuations in an elevated serum urate concentration.


according to the mayo Clinic's recent research on gout has created a clearer picture of the role of diet in disease management. Some foods should be avoided, but not all foods with purines should be eliminated. And some foods should be included in your diet to control uric acid levels.

The purpose of a gout diet today is to address all factors related to disease risk and management. Above all, the goals are a healthy weight and healthy eating — a message that applies to lowering the risk of many diseases.

Diet disease gout details

The general principles of a gout diet are essentially the same as recommendations for a balanced, healthy diet:

  • Weight loss. Being overweight increases the risk of developing gout, and losing weight lowers the risk of gout. Research suggests that reducing the number of calories and losing weight — even without a purine-restricted diet — lowers uric acid levels and reduces the number of gout attacks. Losing weight also lessens the overall stress on joints.
  • Complex carbs. Eat more fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which provide complex carbohydrates. Avoid foods such as white bread, cakes, candy, sugar-sweetened beverages and products with high-fructose corn syrup.
  • Water. Keep yourself hydrated by drinking water. An increase in water consumption has been linked to fewer gout attacks. Aim for eight to 16 glasses of fluids a day with at least half of that as water. A glass is 8 ounces (237 milliliters). Talk to your doctor about appropriate fluid intake goals for you.
  • Fats. Cut back on saturated fats from red meats, fatty poultry and high-fat dairy products.
  • Proteins. Limit daily proteins from lean meat, fish and poultry to 4 to 6 ounces (113 to 170 grams). Add protein to your diet with low-fat or fat-free dairy products, such as low-fat yogurt or skim milk, which are associated with reduced uric acid levels.

Recommendations for specific foods or supplements include the following:

  • High-purine vegetables. Studies have shown that vegetables high in purines do not increase the risk of gout or recurring gout attacks. A healthy diet based on lots of fruits and vegetables can include high-purine vegetables, such as asparagus, spinach, peas, cauliflower or mushrooms. You can also eat beans or lentils, which are moderately high in purines but are also a good source of protein.
  • Organ and glandular meats. Avoid meats such as liver, kidney and sweetbreads, which have high purine levels and contribute to high blood levels of uric acid.
  • Selected seafood. Avoid the following types of seafood, which are higher in purines than others: anchovies, herring, sardines, mussels, scallops, trout, haddock, mackerel and tuna.
  • Alcohol. The metabolism of alcohol in your body is thought to increase uric acid production, and alcohol contributes to dehydration. Beer is associated with an increased risk of gout and recurring attacks, as are distilled liquors to some extent. The effect of wine is not as well-understood. If you drink alcohol, talk to your doctor about what is appropriate for you.
  • Vitamin C. Vitamin C may help lower uric acid levels. Talk to your doctor about whether a 500-milligram vitamin C supplement fits into your diet and medication plan.
  • Coffee. Some research suggests that moderate coffee consumption may be associated with a reduced risk of gout, particularly with regular caffeinated coffee. Drinking coffee may not be appropriate for other medical conditions. Talk to your doctor about how much coffee is right for you.
  • Cherries. There is some evidence that eating cherries is associated with a reduced risk of gout attacks.

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Diet Disease Gout

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